Programming Language

C#

C# (programminglanguage)
Full NameC# OR C Sharp
Short NameC#
DescriptionC# is a multi-paradigm programming language encompassing strong typing, imperative, declarative, functional, generic, object-oriented (class-based), and component-oriented programming disciplines
CompanyMicrosoft
WebYes
MobileYes
EnterpriseYes
EmbeddedNo
Snippet from Wikipedia: C Sharp (programming language)

C# ( see sharp) is a general-purpose, multi-paradigm programming language. C# encompasses static typing, strong typing, lexically scoped, imperative, declarative, functional, generic, object-oriented (class-based), and component-oriented programming disciplines.

The C# programming language was designed by Anders Hejlsberg from Microsoft in 2000 and was later approved as an international standard by Ecma (ECMA-334) in 2002 and ISO/IEC (ISO/IEC 23270) in 2003. Microsoft introduced C# along with .NET Framework and Visual Studio, both of which were closed-source. At the time, Microsoft had no open-source products. Four years later, in 2004, a free and open-source project called Mono began, providing a cross-platform compiler and runtime environment for the C# programming language. A decade later, Microsoft released Visual Studio Code (code editor), Roslyn (compiler), and the unified .NET platform (software framework), all of which support C# and are free, open-source, and cross-platform. Mono also joined Microsoft but was not merged into .NET.

As of July 2022, the most recent stable version of the language is C# 10.0, which was released in 2021 in .NET 6.0.

GitHub Topics

C# (pronounced “C sharp”) is a simple, modern, object-oriented, and type-safe programming language.

Its roots in the C family of languages makes C# immediately familiar to C, C++, and Java programmers.

using System;

internal static class HelloWorld
{
    private static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hello, world!");
    }
}

Source: Wikibooks

See also: Programming Languages

  • dev/c_sharp.txt
  • Last modified: 2022/08/14 14:50
  • by Henrik Yllemo