Universal package manager

Snippet from Wikipedia: Package manager

A package manager or package-management system is a collection of software tools that automates the process of installing, upgrading, configuring, and removing computer programs for a computer's operating system in a consistent manner.

A package manager deals with packages, distributions of software and data in archive files. Packages contain metadata, such as the software's name, description of its purpose, version number, vendor, checksum, and a list of dependencies necessary for the software to run properly. Upon installation, metadata is stored in a local package database. Package managers typically maintain a database of software dependencies and version information to prevent software mismatches and missing prerequisites. They work closely with software repositories, binary repository managers, and app stores.

Package managers are designed to eliminate the need for manual installs and updates. This can be particularly useful for large enterprises whose operating systems are based on Linux and other Unix-like systems, typically consisting of hundreds or even tens of thousands of distinct software packages.

Snippet from Wikipedia: Software repository

A software repository, or “repo” for short, is a storage location for software packages. Often a table of contents is stored, as well as metadata. Repositories group packages. Sometimes the grouping is for a programming language, such as CPAN for the Perl programming language, sometimes for an entire operating system, sometimes the license of the contents is the criteria.

Client side, package managers help installing from and updating the repositories.

Server side a software repository is typically managed by source control or repository managers. Some of the repository managers allow to aggregate other repository location into one URL and provide a caching proxy. When doing continuous builds a lot of artifacts are produced and often centrally stored, so automatically deleting the ones which are not released is important.

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